How to Conquer Finals Week

As the end of the semester is upon us and final exams and project deadlines are rapidly approaching, there are many strategies and coping mechanisms that we can use to help us manage our time, studying, and stress. Finals season is commonly considered a stress-inducing time in college, but with a little organization, effective study strategies, and attention to your health and well-being, it doesn’t have to be this way. Here are some tips to keep in mind as we head into finals season!

1. Schedule and plan

First and foremost, create a schedule for your finals studying or final project work time. Planning when you want to start studying for each final exam and how much time you want to dedicate to that exam will help you avoid cramming, pulling all-nighters, and feeling underprepared! With multiple final exams, it can be tempting to put off studying for your later exams. Starting your studying for an exam earlier rather than later is always the best option and making a study schedule can help you do that. Take a pen to paper and actually write down your study schedule or put it in your Google calendar, but just make sure to hold yourself to it! Set specific goals for each block of studying, like “Monday evening, I will review chapters 14-16, go over my class notes for these chapters, and do 10 practice problems from these chapters.” This will help ensure that you’ve allotted enough time for reviewing all the material you need to study. If there were concepts and chapters that you didn’t quite understand at first, allow yourself more time for studying those sections. Creating a schedule for finals studying is a great way to stay organized and better prepare for your exams.

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Make a detailed study schedule and stick to it for finals! Image via Pinterest.com

 

2. Maintain balance in your life

Studying isn’t the only thing you should include in your schedule when planning your time for final exam season! Carving out time for exercise and connecting with friends is important to maintain your physical and mental health. According to this Active.com article, exercise signals the release of several key hormones which help us focus and feel better, thus improving our memory, attention, and accuracy over time. Of course, getting sleep and eating should not be blown off during this time in the semester. If you want to retain information and perform your best on your finals, getting enough sleep is vital. According to this PsychCentral article about improving your memory, eating healthy and getting a good night’s sleep are essential to improving your memory. Eating meals can also serve as a time to take a break and socialize with your friends. Finding time to spend with friends is a great way to reward yourself by taking time away from studying in order to stay motivated during finals season.

3. Utilize good study strategies

Utilizing study strategies can be very helpful if you want to study for long periods of time. Try studying in intervals by setting a timer for 25-30 minutes where you focus fully for that period of time, then take a five-minute break when the timer goes off. This is referred to as the Pomodoro technique, which you can read more about here. When there is a lot of material you want to review, making study guides and summarizing your notes for each chapter is a great technique. Form study groups to make studying for final exams a little less painful. Your study partners may be able to help you understand topics that you struggle with and vice versa. Explaining concepts and topics to others will reinforce your knowledge of the material.

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The Pomodoro Technique is one method for studying in intervals. Image via Naturalfactors.com

4. Minimize distractions

Minimize distractions like the TV, your phone, and music that you like to sing along to while studying. Having your phone nearby can affect your focus and productivity if you are tempted to constantly check your messages or go on social media. Try putting your phone somewhere out of sight when you’re studying. If you have to check it, try to avoid opening social media because scrolling through social media feeds can suck you in, consuming more time than you might have anticipated spending on your phone. Listening to music helps a lot of people focus while studying, but try to avoid songs and artists that will make you want to sing along rather than focus on your studying. Opt for music that is more lowkey, soothing, and maybe doesn’t contain lyrics, like classical or instrumental music. Recently, I’ve been searching “study” on Spotify and there are a lot of playlists that people have created with non-distracting, chill study music that helps you focus!

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Find a good study music playlist that you like and isn’t distracting! Screenshot via Allison Desantis

5. Alternate your study space

Another tip for studying for long periods of time is to switch up your environment. It is easy to lose concentration when you’ve been in the same room or spot for hours. If you’ve spent a lot of time studying in your dorm or apartment, change up your environment by studying in the library, an academic building, or a coffee shop. Tidying up your study environment in your dorm or apartment is also a great way to feel refreshed and de-clutter your mind in preparation for your studying.

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Squires is one option for a finals study space and is offering free coffee, snacks, and de-stressing activities like yoga and playing with therapy animals during finals week! Image via Student Engagement and Campus Life at Virginia Tech

These tips might seem basic, but they are important to keep in mind as you start thinking about final exams. Stay positive during this time of year and remember that your grades and GPA are not the only things that define you. Good luck finishing up this semester; I know you are all capable of conquering finals!

By: Allison DeSantis

 

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Summer Break Preparation

As finals approach and this year comes to an end, it is hard to keep our minds off of summer break. With that being said, CWIB has a few suggestions to help you plan for the most productive, yet revitalizing, summer possible! As college students, we often find ourselves overwhelmed with the stress of managing heavy course loads, extracurriculars, social events, and much more. The summer months can serve as a great opportunity to take a step back, catch your breath, and plan for the future without the pressure of deadlines weighing on your conscience. Whether you have an internship, summer job, or are giving yourself a summer off from either, here are five simple guidelines to ensure you make the most out of your break:

 

1.Keep a calendar, planner, or schedule- Just as you would during the year, managing your time during the summer is essential. You can include events relating to academics, socializing, personal time, or anything else important in your life. Regardless of what it is, staying organized can make a big difference in helping you establish what activities you want or need to accomplish. You have to make the most out of the three months we call summer, and planning can help you decide how you want to spend those months. Remember, it is important to balance work and play. Stay focused on your goals and aspirations all while enjoying your ample free time.

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Photo credit: PicsWe

2. Take time for yourself- Your body and mind have been through a lot over the course of the past school year. Stress can take a toll on us all, and it is important to give yourself time to recuperate. We often find it difficult to devote time to ourselves due to the hectic schedules we have during the school year. The summer months give us an opportunity to change that! Working out, eating healthy, and resting are just a few ways to nourish our bodies. Do whatever works best for you, but continue to make it a priority throughout the summer!

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Photo Credit: DeskGram

3. Do something you love- You only have a limited number of summers as a college student, so make them memorable. Spending your days doing something that gives you joy can go a long way in bringing you happiness throughout the next year. Whatever it may be, do it for you and your own enjoyment. Taking care of our own happiness is one of the most important things in life. As human beings, we conform to what others want to do far too often, but this summer can be a fresh start in taking care of ourselves and fulfilling our own desires! You have worked hard this past year, and you deserve to do something you love this summer.

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Photo credit: Pinterest

4. Think about the future. Planning for your future academic and career goals during a time that is not filled with stress can be very beneficial. You can rationally form the steps you will need to complete in order to get that job, internship, position, or any other aspiration. Ask yourself what do I want my future to look like? Then use this summer to your advantage. It can be a great way for you to grow into who you want to become! If you want something specific out of the upcoming school year, what can you do this summer to work towards that goal?

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Photo credit: J Miller & Company Twitter

5.Be proactive. It is easy to say you want something, but it takes strength to go and get that something. If you set a goal for yourself, work towards it. If you want to do a specific activity, do it. It is easy to waste away summer days because there is not a set schedule of classes or meetings you have to attend but strive to avoid those wasted days this summer. No one ever remembers the day they sat inside watching television for 14 hours straight. They remember the days they accomplished a goal or experienced something new. Make every day count.

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Photo credit: JuliaDub

No matter what you plan to do this summer, we hope you use the time as a way to grow, destress from the past school year, and make memories that will last you a lifetime. Use the upcoming summer months as motivation to work hard throughout the end of this semester!

 

By: Allison Wood

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Preparing the Way for More Women in Sports

Sports are a major way to connect people of differing backgrounds. They bring about intense emotions as athletes and coaches can inspire the everyday person to reach for greatness. However, more often than not the image that pops up in our heads is of a male athlete, coach, or sports announcer. Women continue to struggle for equal respect in their athletic abilities. While women do not receive the same attention as men do when it comes to sports, we are taking the steps in the right direction. This comes from the support of male-dominated organizations providing women with equal opportunities.

A recent ESPN article caught my attention as the headline stated, “Buccaneers hire 2 female assistant coaches.” Lori Locust and Maral Javadifar were hired by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers as assistant defensive line coach and assistant strength and conditioning coach, respectively (Schefter). This accomplishment made these two women the first full-time female coaches in the Buccaneers’ franchise.  

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Locust (left) and Javadifar (right) were the first female assistant coaches hired in Buccaneers franchise history. Image via FOX.

Both women were extensively qualified for these positions as Locust has had coaching experience with the Baltimore Ravens as an intern and as defensive line coach for the Alliance of American Football’s Birmingham Iron. She has additional experience playing the sport herself at the semi-professional level (Schefter). Javadifar comes from an athletic background too as she played college basketball at Pace University. She furthered her education at New York Medical College where she received her doctorate in physical therapy; from there, she completed her sports physical therapy residency at Virginia Commonwealth University (Schefter). There was no question that Locust and Javadifar take their work seriously. Thanks to Tampa Bay head coach Bruce Arians, he took their accomplishments seriously too.

The National Football League (NFL) is predominantly composed of male athletes, coaches, and general managers, so women may often be overlooked when it comes to their inclusion within this organization. Tampa Bay Head Coach Bruce Arians stated, “I know how hard it can be to get that first opportunity to coach at the highest level of professional football. Sometimes, all you need is the right organization to offer up the opportunity.” While general NFL viewers would not initially picture women as a part of the team staff, Arians realized that it shouldn’t matter whether a man or a woman is a coach, as long as he or she knows how to coach. ” ‘I have known Lori going back to my days at Temple University, and I’ve seen firsthand just how knowledgeable and passionate she is about this game,’ Arians said. ‘I was equally impressed with Maral’s background in performance training and physical therapy, and I know she will be a valuable asset to our strength and conditioning program,’ ” (Schefter). Arians recognized the abilities of these women and that’s all he needed as confirmation they would be successful contributors to the team. Their gender was never a second thought.

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Bruce Arians is the head coach for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and made the decision to add Locust and Javadifar to his staff. Image via INSCMagazine.

Arians is known for his support of female coaches as he previously hired Jen Welter as a training camp intern for the Arizona Cardinals in 2015, where he was previously the head coach. She is considered the first woman to hold a position with the NFL (Schefter). Hopefully, he can serve as an example to other coaches that hiring women to work in sports is not such a crazy thought after all.

Locust and Javadifar join a total of 55 women working for NFL teams in football operations (Marvez). With the increased number of women working in this field, many would assume there is added pressure on them to prove themselves worthy of the position. In an article from Sporting News, Samantha Rapoport, the NFL’s director of football development, states, “ ‘What we don’t want is the spotlight on one female and her feeling it rests on her shoulders for women to succeed or fail,’ ” (Marvez). One woman’s accomplishment should be something special to her; it should inspire others to do the same, not frighten them that they will not live up to their own potential. So far, this has not been a problem among employees within the NFL as Rapoport complements the organization as being “an absolutely incredibly open, welcoming place to work.”

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Samantha Rapoport is the NFL’s director of football development. She is “tasked with helping ensure females are afforded chances to prosper at all levels in a male-dominated league,” (Marvez). Image via McGill News.

Women who work in sports are becoming more and more common in the world we live in today where increased diversity is not only recommended but demanded by organizations. We can see this past the NFL as the National Basketball Association (NBA) has several women working for their teams, such as the San Antonio Spurs’ Becky Hammon, who became the first female assistant coach in NBA history. Sports reporters like Erin Andrews and Laura Rutledge are paving the way for women in sports media positions. We can see that the opportunities for females in the sports industry are ever increasing across several aspects of the field.

Women such as those mentioned above are role models for women and young girls everywhere that they can be just as successful as men in the sports field. In the future, we can expect to see more women in leadership roles within sports organizations, so if this is something that is of interest to you, don’t be afraid to apply for internships that show you possess these same qualities and skills to be successful in the world of sports!

There are numerous jobs in the sports business. Be sure to check out Teamwork Online at this link to find opportunities that match your strengths and passions, and how they can fit into the sports industry.

 

By: Emma Harwood 

 

Working Effectively as a Team

In college, you’re definitely going to belong to at least one team, whether that be for a class, sports team, or internship. Learning how to effectively work with others during your college career is important because there are few careers post-graduation that don’t involve working on teams! I’m sure we’ve all had experiences working on a team that weren’t so effective, whether that be because of lukewarm commitment from certain members, clashing personalities, or conflicting ideas. Here are some aspects of effective teamwork to keep in mind when you’re in those situations so you can get work done efficiently!

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What teams are you involved in? Do you believe they work effectively? Photo credit: Collegiate Women in Business 

Define a clear mission and approach

Clarifying what your team is trying to achieve and how it aims to do so is an essential task to complete early on in the project. Members must share a commitment to the goals and understand the expectations for the amount of work and time they need to commit to the project or organization. If you find your team is lacking structure, try setting clear roles for members. This way,   what is expected of them. Remember, everyone comes to a team barring different strengths and skills that they can offer. Clarifying the team’s overall mission is important, so that team members know how their individual efforts are playing into the final product or outcome.

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Everyone comes to a team with different strengths and skills that your team can utilize! Photo credit: Collegiate Women in Business

Foster an open environment where dissent is welcome

The great thing about a team is that it brings together people with diverse backgrounds and skillsets. When you have different perspectives and opinions on your team, the chance of producing innovative ideas increases. According to an article about effective teamwork from The Balance Careers, “the team creates an environment in which people are comfortable taking reasonable risks in communicating, advocating positions, and taking action.” If members of your team are not comfortable disagreeing or proposing new ideas, your team might be experiencing a groupthink situation. According to Psychology Today, groupthink occurs when a well-intentioned group makes irrational or non-optimal decisions out of the urge to conform or fear of dissent. You want to watch out for groupthink when working on your teams because respectful disagreement and discussion will ultimately improve the outcome of your teamwork. An effective team environment is one where everyone feels comfortable sharing their opinions.

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In an effective team environment, everyone feels comfortable sharing their opinions! Photo credit: Heather Sangalang

Resolve problems and conflicts

Resolving problems and conflicts is important if you want your team to be effective and efficient. While it may be tempting when friendship is involved, picking sides during team member personality conflicts does not support the resolution of the conflict. Your team should work towards a mutual resolution of problems and disagreements. According to a Forbes article, all members feel visible, valued, and involved in effective teams. Therefore, if one member doesn’t feel this way, something needs to be addressed. If a conflict or clash comes up on your team, it needs to be resolved, so that you can continue tackling your goals. Nobody will be motivated to work if there is tension in the group, right?

Working on teams will continue to be a part of our college and post-graduation careers, so let’s work on growing our teamwork skills now! If you feel like your team is lacking in some of these areas, communicate that with them. Other members of your team might be feeling the same way and will appreciate you stepping up. CWIB believes in your power to lead effective teams and empower your peers to achieve your goals!

 

By: Allison DeSantis 

Do’s and Don’ts when Contacting Employers

The way we represent ourselves in online correspondences can say a lot about the people and employees we are or may be in the future. It’s often easier to convey certain messages by communicating in person, but mastering how to communicate electronically is critical in the professional world. Whether you are contacting a potential or current employer, DO follow these three main guidelines:

 

  • Use a formal tone
  • Format with an introduction, body, and conclusion
  • Represent yourself well

 

Using a formal tone is crucial in showcasing your professionalism. Contact with an employer is of a business nature and should be treated as so. It is always best to err on the side of formality than to set a poor first impression by being too casual. To begin, your subject line should convey the main idea of your message. Two to six words are recommended, as one-word explanations are not descriptive. You want to grab the recipient’s attention to ensure they will read your message. Next, use a formal greeting, such as “Dear,” using the employers last name and proper prefix, such as “Dr. Brown” or “Mrs. Smith.” After your initial email, follow the lead of the employer in their response. If they addressed you with “Hi _____” and signed their message with “Kevin,” then your next greeting should be “Hi Kevin.”

One significant factor to consider when it comes to tone is the syntax you use. According to Career Cast, nearly 50 percent of all emails imply an unintended tone. Communication online can be easily misunderstood, so diction is incredibly important to focus on. To avoid misinterpretation, use words and phrases that are easily understood. For example, instead of  writing “Be ready for Thursday,” you can use “Please bring the sales report to Thursday’s meeting.” Specificity is key! You do not want to leave anything up for interpretation. Also, do not use language that is only common to your way of speaking such as college slang. Finally, avoid long and complex wording, as this gives the reader a higher chance of misunderstanding.

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Examples of different greetings to use. Graphic provided by The Balance Careers

With the help of a beginning, middle, and end format, your emails will have the structure needed to inform and connect with your recipient. Your introduction should include a quick greeting, showing you are personable. “I hope your job search is going well!” is an example of a great preface for a friendly conversation. Although it seems excessive, it really does make a difference in their view of you. “It was great meeting you at Business Horizons” is also an example of a charismatic statement, which simultaneously reminds the reader of who you are. Another introduction often used is a statement about why you are reaching out, such as “I am contacting you about your job application.” Regardless, your introduction sets the premise for the entire string of communication. You want to show you are both affable and proactive in your professional career!

The body of your correspondence contains the most important content. Here, you want to give your reader the information they will need to complete the task you are asking of them, an explanation of what you are informing them of, or any other data needed to accomplish the goal of your message. It is important to avoid rambling, while also ensuring all of the content needed for the email is present.  You do not want the reader to wonder what the purpose of your email is, but you do not want them to stop reading halfway through your message simply because it’s too long. Include only what is necessary!

To conclude, provide action steps, a salutation, and your full name. Actions steps can include a date and time to meet, a statement of your excitement to hear back from your reader, a proposition, or anything else to advance towards the goal of your correspondence. Examples of a salutation are “Best regards,” “Thank you,” “Sincerely,” or any other polite closing. Follow the salutation with your full name, avoiding any nicknames. You also want to include an electronic signature with your contact information. Remember, your conclusion is the last opportunity to show the recipient of your efforts!

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Seven pointers to remember. Graphic provided by Cupcakes and Cashmere.

Representing yourself well may seem like a simple task, but individual details can make a big difference. Re-read your email multiple times before sending it off. You can even have a friend or colleague edit it for safety measures. Also, make sure to fact check all of your information to make sure everything is accurate. Are names spelled right? Are dates correct? A great tool to use for proofreading is Grammarly! It is an online grammar checking, spell checking, and plagiarism detection platform. You can download the software onto your computer in just a few minutes! A misspelling, grammatical error, or improper punctuation can be the reason another candidate was hired or promoted over you. Show the workplace what you are capable of! Electronic communication is also an opportunity to give the recipient a glimpse into your writing skills. Employers are impressed with those who are effective in their writing, while also being concise and to-the-point. Whether you are writing an email to an employer, colleague, or a client, knowing how to compose messages is a crucial business skill. It’s a component of your professionalism.

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An important overview of email guidelines. Graphic provided by The Balance Careers.

Regardless of the reasoning behind sending an email to an employer, use it as an opportunity to convey your determination in relation to your career. Use these guidelines to protect yourself from making simple mistakes when it comes to electronic communication. CWIB believes in all of you to communicate effectively and professionally with your employers, potential or current, and leave a lasting impression on them!

 

By: Allison Wood 

 

 

 

Asking Questions in an Interview

While an interview is a chance for a company to get to know you and your skills, it is also an opportunity for you to learn more about the company and the role you’re interviewing for. After all, you want to work at a company that is a good fit for your personality, career goals, and work style, right?  In addition to finding out if this company is the right place for you, asking questions shows that you came prepared and are actually interested in working there. This article from The Muse cites recruiter Angela Smith explaining, “If an applicant doesn’t have any questions for me, that’s a red flag. I’m thinking that they either don’t care or can’t be bothered to do research about my company.” Therefore, make sure to do your pre-interview research!

During the interview, more questions will likely pop into your head, but it’s a good idea to have a few prepared. That being said, make sure you’re not too focused on forming questions during an interview that you stop paying attention to what the interviewer is saying; they might answer some of your questions along the way! Also, you don’t want to stump your interviewer with difficult or confusing questions. Keep your questions specific, but open-ended (avoid yes or no questions). This will give the interviewer a chance to dive deeper with their answers!

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An interview is a chance for you and the interviewer to learn more about each other! Photo credit: Collegiate Women in Business

I’ve broken down the types of questions to ask in an interview into four sections: about the company, role-specific, interviewer’s personal experiences, and next steps. These are by no means the only questions you can ask during an interview; they are just a few ideas to get you started!

About the Company

Team culture, work-life balance, and diversity of a company are all important aspects to consider when deciding which company to work for. You are going to be spending a good chunk of your week there, so you need to ensure that you’re going to like where you are! While there are a plethora of questions you can ask about the company, here are a few ideas.

  • How would you describe the culture of (insert company name)?
  • What values are most important to the company?
  • What are the company’s long-term goals and plans to achieve those goals? (Tailor this one based on the company: Are they developing new products, expanding into new markets, growing specific teams/departments within their company, etc.)
  • What are the company’s current goals and how does the team support those goals?
  • Would you describe the work environment as more collaborative or independent?
  • Does the company have any diversity and inclusion initiatives or networks?
  • Do employees participate in any team events outside of work?
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Company culture is an important factor to consider when interviewing! CWIB visited Custom Ink on the D.C. Trek, a company that’s known to have a great culture. Photo credit: Collegiate Women in Business

Role-Specific

It may seem obvious to many of you, but you want to ask questions about the specific role you applied for in an interview. Many interviewers give a rundown of the role at the beginning of an interview so some of your questions might get answered. Here are a few questions to ask if you find yourself wanting more information about the work you’ll be doing

  • What kinds of projects would I be working on?
  • What projects have interns/associates worked on in the past?
  • What would the training process be like?
  • What are the main technologies/software/platforms I would be working with?
  • What skills do I need to excel in this role?
  • What would a typical day in this role look like?

 

Interviewer’s Experience

The interviewer’s own experiences can be a great wealth of information to tap into during an interview. They are a professional in an industry you aspire to work in, so they have some nuggets of wisdom to share. Asking your interviewer questions about their experiences will also build rapport and show that you value their perspective. Here are a few questions you could ask your interviewer about their career.

  • How long have you been with (insert company name)?
  • What are the biggest challenges you face as an (insert specific role) in the (insert industry)?
  • Has your role changed since you’ve been with the company?
  • What is your favorite part about working at the company?
  • What advice would you give to someone aspiring to work in this industry/role?
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Don’t be afraid to pick your interviewer’s brain! Learning about their career journey and experience with the company can give you a lot of insight. Photo credit: Collegiate Women in Business

Next Steps

If the interviewer doesn’t explicitly explain, you might want to ask about the next steps in the interview process. Asking questions like these will show that you’re still interested in the internship or job after the conversation you just had.

  • What are the next steps in the interview process?
  • Will there be another round of interviews?
  • What is the timeline for the selection process?
  • Do you have any concerns about my background being a good fit for the role? (This might be a scary one to ask, but it gives you the chance to put the interviewer’s concerns at ease and gives you valuable feedback for the future.)

 

Hopefully, these interview questions were helpful in offering some ideas on how to get the most out of your interviews. Some questions cannot be answered on the internet, so don’t be shy to ask the genuine questions you want to be answered about the company! Good luck interviewing this spring!

 

By: Allison DeSantis

How to Perfect Your Elevator Pitch

       Introducing yourself to company representatives for the first time can be scary, especially if you’ve never been to an event like Business Horizons before. A key thing that you should bring with you to professional events like these is an elevator pitch. If you take the time to prepare and practice one, you will feel much more confident in making those first introductions!

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What is it?

        If you haven’t heard of an elevator pitch before, it is basically a sales pitch for yourself that would last about the same amount of time as going up an elevator. It is a great way for a company representative or recruiter to gain insight into your experience and determine why they should hire you. Using an elevator pitch is an important tool to have at the career fair because it allows you to showcase your strengths and abilities. Remember that it won’t make or break your conversation with the representative, but it can help things run more smoothly.

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How to prepare for it

The first step you should take to create an elevator pitch is to make a list of your experiences that you would want to tell a company employee or recruiter about. Try to narrow it down to a few of your favorite ones that are relevant to the work that the company you are interested in does. The goal is to share the experiences that would show that you are qualified to work for them.

Don’t forget to tie in your interests. Doing so will prove to the recruiter that you would be passionate in that role you are after. For example, if you’re talking to a technology company, you can talk about your appreciation for project management, familiarity with certain coding languages, or support for future innovative technology tools that are being implemented in that industry. Plus, when you talk about things that bring excitement to you, you will give off great energy, which is what you want to have during this first impression!

Next, make sure to do your research. If there are specific companies you want to talk to at Business Horizons, it’s a good idea to do some research about them so you can include aspects about you that best align with their mission. Recruiters will be impressed that you took the time to learn more about them because it showcases your interest in them. Also, it leads to better flow in conversation. It’ll be easier for you to ask meaningful questions and give exceptional answers.

Once you have finished compiling and organizing the important details of your pitch, start piecing it all together. Tell them your name, year and major at the beginning. Then, transition to the meat of the pitch. Whether you decide to talk about your experiences or interests first does not really matter as long as you touch on both and connect them appropriately. Lastly, end with expressing your interest in the positions that are open at that company.

Remember to keep it clear and concise. Since it’s supposed to be an introduction, there’s no need to go into details or explanations unless a recruiter wants to expand on something you’ve said. According to Deloitte’s Elevator Speech 101 Article, “the clearer and more articulate you are in delivering who you are and why you want a certain position, may result in your name being placed at the top of the call back list for a second or third interview.

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Once you have everything you want in your elevator pitch, practice in front of a mirror or a friend. Practicing will help you be more confident when the time comes to deliver! The way you deliver your pitch is just as important as the content discussed previously.

First, make sure you talk at a steady speed. Quickly reciting your pitch may make it hard to hear or understand certain things you say. Taking a deep breath before starting will calm your nerves and prepare you to deliver a great pitch. Second, make eye contact with the person you are speaking with because it allows he/she to stay focused on you. Plus, it is just professional. Lastly, avoid fidgeting with your hands or hair. Besides from being distracting, it also shows the recruiter that you are nervous. Practicing your pitch several times will allow you to build the confidence needed to say that pitch at the career fair!

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Engage the recruiters with your elevator pitch tomorrow! Photo source: VT Career and Professional Development

There you have it! An elevator pitch shouldn’t be something to stress about as long as you take the time to think about and practice what you want to portray to the representative or recruiter. It’s important to keep in mind that this is most likely going to be the given company’s first impression of you. Present yourself professionally, recite your pitch with confidence and energy, and emphasize that you are a perfect candidate for the job. You have a short time frame, so fill it wisely!

 

Good luck tomorrow at Business Horizon, everyone!

 

By: Abby Perkins