Mastering the Handshake

The handshake is not a new movement, in fact its beginnings date back thousands of years. Historians believe that the gesture began as a way of conveying peaceful intentions, that by extending their empty right hands strangers could show each other they did not hold any weapons and intended no harm. Although the handshake has evolved over time, it eventually became a part of commonplace etiquette and a sign of courtesy and friendliness.

However, there is so much more that goes into a handshake. The handshake is a first impression, it can be a make or break in a job interview, and it may influence whether you strike a big deal or not. The handshake can play a part in many different business decisions, which may sound silly, however a great handshake makes you appear confident, professional, and more trustworthy. A handshake is a personal connection between two people; it displays mutual respect. Even when it is impersonal, a great handshake can help convey your personality and intentions towards the other person. When is the appropriate time to shake someone’s hand? When being introduced to someone, when saying goodbye to someone, at the beginning or end of a business meeting or interview, and whenever deemed appropriate within a business context, such as sealing a deal.

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There are a few guidelines to remember in order to have an unforgettable handshake. First things first, you have to be ready for it! Make sure your right hand is free. Move anything out of your right hand well before you know you’re about to give a handshake, that way you’re not awkwardly fumbling your items around. If you’re sitting down, rise before shaking someone’s hand. Have your hands out in the open rather than in your pockets – you will look more confident and trustworthy. Then, extend your right hand straight out. Don’t have your palm facing either up or down; the palm should meet with the palm of the other person. Next, you will take the other person’s hand in a firm, but not knuckle crushing, clasp making sure the web between your thumb and fingers meets the web of the other person’s hand. While keeping your hand parallel to the ground, pump your hand up and down about two or three times.

In a job interview, the handshake is crucial. Don’t spend a lot of time stressing about it beforehand, however you should always prepare. Sweaty hands can be common before a big interview as we all get nervous! However, make sure to wash, dry or wipe off sweaty hands right before your interview. One tip to impress the recruiter or interviewer is to be the first to reach out, this shows great confidence. If you follow the handshake tips as mentioned, your interviewer will be impressed with you before you’ve even said anything!

Although a handshake may sound like a simple action, it is actually not that hard to do it wrong. Let’s go into some things to avoid. First, the limp shake is a big no. This gives off the impression you’re shy or lack confidence. Try to follow the tips mentioned above and, when in doubt, just mirror the other person’s grip. There is also a “knuckle crusher” handshake that is the opposite of a limp handshake, but must be avoided as well. Again, use moderate pressure so that the handshake is firm but not hurting the other person’s hand. Another mistake people make is shaking hands for too long. Try to stick to about 2 or 3 pumps in order to avoid an awkwardly long greeting. Lastly, steer clear from the “politicians’ handshake”. This is when you’re shaking someone’s hand and then place your left hand on top. This kind of handshake is to be avoided unless it is a more personal greeting.

Don’t forget about your body language! Stand up tall as if there is a string pulling you to the ceiling and face the person directly, rather than a side stance. Make sure to speak clearly and confidently to block out any nerves you may be feeling internally. Don’t fidget, as this can be distracting to the other person and they may perceive you as nervous or shy. Lastly, as you break away from the handshake do not look down. Looking down after a handshake will also make you appear shy, nervous, or untrustworthy. Most importantly, use plenty of eye contact, this will exert your confidence in the situation.

 

politician handshake

As members of Collegiate Women in Business we are lucky to have many opportunities to practice our handshakes. Whether it’s at coffee chats, monthly meetings, networking opportunities, or treks, we have plenty of time to perfect the handshake with fellow members, sponsors, and professionals before it comes time for the first big job interview and beyond. Remember, the handshake is a seemingly simple formality, however it is an opportunity to make a lasting impression, Keep these guidelines in mind and you’ll be shaking hands like a pro in no time!

By: Lindsay Barnes 

 

“Did I Post That?”: Being Professional on Social Media

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What’s the Problem?

Posting on Facebook is important. Really. It helps us to keep up with distant friends and family, as well as to network and pursue opportunities in our professional lives. However, there is a difference between how we should DM our friends and how we should connect with our bosses and coworkers. Staying professional online can be a challenge, and deciding what is appropriate to share with which people is often a grey area. And, when we do accidentally post something inappropriate for the workplace, it can have a very negative impact on the way we are viewed by important business connections, recruiters, and employers. It has cost some the respect of their coworkers, and others their jobs. As daunting as it may seem, using social media should not be a tense and frightening activity, but should be fun and beneficial to our personal and professional relationships. Only common sense and a little caution are necessary.

Mindless Mistakes

Knowing the reality of making an unfortunate or ill-informed post on our social media accounts can help us understand the gravity of our words and actions online. What we say really does matter, especially to our employers and supervisors. One cringe-inciting example of making a major mistake on social media is that of a recent grad in 2009, Connor Riley. Riley, shortly after accepting a job at Cisco, a major technology company based in California, posted on Twitter that she would now have to “weigh the utility of a fatty paycheck against the daily commute to San Jose and hating the work” (Sun). This sentiment was not only seen by her friends and family, but by an associate at Cisco, who informed her that they would be making a visit to HR about her comment. Riley’s offer was most likely withdrawn, thereafter.

Posting something off-color or offensive is never appropriate and can have ramifications that extend far beyond workplace reputation. Gilbert Goddfried, the ex-voice of the Aflac duck (as seen in their numerous TV commercials), once tweeted some insensitive statements regarding a recent tsunami in Japan, in 2011. He joked, “Japan is really advanced. They don’t go to the beach. The beach comes to them” (Sun). The lack of sympathy and respect he showed for the Japanese people, who were struggling with a major catastrophe, was evident even to Goddried’s employers, who quickly relieved him of his position. Not everyone’s sense of humor is the same. It is crucial to consider if what we may think is funny, may actually be offensive or hurtful to others, and would be better left unsaid.

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What Do We Do?

Deciding what is ok to post and say in front of our employers and coworkers can be tricky. What should they be able to see and know about in regards to our personal lives, hobbies, and interests? Here is a guide to help distinguish what to do and what not to do on our social media accounts in order to maintain a clean and professional appearance online:

1. Pay Attention to Privacy   Configure privacy settings, so it is easy to monitor who requests to follow your account. This way you can control who sees what you post and say. Address any accounts that do not seem familiar or that write unwanted comments on your posts. Similarly, pay attention to pictures others tag you in. People can tag you in pictures without your permission, so it is crucial to un-tag yourself or request for the picture to be removed if it is embarrassing or detrimental to your image online.

2. What You Say Matters  When commenting on other people’s posts or direct messaging other people, make sure to use appropriate language. Avoid swearing, inappropriate slang, derogatory names and terms, and hate speech. Using colorful language can leave a bad impression on those who wish to learn more about you as an employee. In terms of conversation, try not to talk about sensitive or inflammatory topics that could easily incite conflict or outrage. Especially if you feel as if your opinion on the subject is unpopular. You have a right to express your opinion, but it is better not to purposely start fights online. This includes expressing support or condemnation via liking and commenting on certain posts, as well as following certain personalities online. Lastly, keep rude comments about coworkers, friends, and employers to yourself. Additionally, do the same for complaints about work, pay, and other people at work. This is pretty obvious — it looks bad when you criticize your place of work in public.

3. The Golden Rule   Treat others how you want to be treated. This means being polite and civil in all exchanges you have online, whether it be replying to comments or conversations you have with others. In being polite, you should always respond quickly and thoughtfully to messages and questions. Stay positive and patient in your responses, taking care not to start arguments or say anything offensive, as seen in the previous rule.

4. Oversharing Overload  These days, everyone seems to put their entire lives online. With all of the oversharing that happens on social media, overloading our followers with deeply personal information or hundreds of pictures per day is truly something to avoid. First and foremost, ensure that all pictures you choose to share of yourself online are both free of obscene images and embarrassing or revealing situations. You should be appropriately dressed, not participating in any illegal or dangerous activities, and not doing anything that could damage your reputation or that you would not want a coworker to know about. Finally, know what moments should be shared, and which should be kept private. Sensitive personal or family information or situations are all moments that usually should be kept to yourself.

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In Conclusion

Don’t let social media scare you. Yes, it is important to consider what we post carefully and always try to present ourselves in the best possible way, but that does not mean that we have to constantly worry about what other people think about us online. Post about what matters to you, but always keep it clean and civil. Whatever you put online will be difficult to take back, so try not to show or say anything you would soon come to regret. Social media is a great tool to help us build relationships with others, and should be approached in the same way as any other tool; with a good understanding of how to use it properly. As members of CWIB, we can utilize our social media accounts to connect with each other, as well as with new job opportunities and other interesting organizations. Even if we use this tool every day, it is always helpful to remind ourselves of the impacts of our presence online and consider what we can do to improve how we approach such an integral part of our lives.

By: Lauren Miles 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Climbing Up the Ladder: A Guide to Attaining Leadership Positions

Being a business major has to do with a lot more than just reading a textbook or completing complex math problems. It has to do with networking, getting involved on campus, and exhibiting leadership skills that not enough classes may take into their own hands to teach to their students. However, those who have been getting involved in organizations such as Collegiate Women in Business are already ahead of the game. Collegiate Women in Business has helped us with the skills already included in our pillars: empower, prepare, and connect, which are all valuable tools in such a competitive and popular career field. However, many of us are now asking ourselves, “Where do we go from here?” What can we do to go beyond what we have already achieved, and impress those who will review our resumes in the near future?

Leadership Positions

There are over 700 organizations at Virginia Tech, and many more leadership positions within these organizations. Multiple positions can exist for each organization, including President, Vice President, Secretary, Treasurer, or Historian. In fact, Collegiate Women in Business offers a variety of positions to its members- a marketing committee consisting of multiple members with roles fit to their unique skills, and writers for the Chronicles, an online blog of CWIB’s. By inquiring the leaders of different organizations in order to understand their perspective on how they developed such skills, you can already get a lead on attaining such positions by showing interest in getting involved.

CWIB Leadership diagram

Most of recruitment for leadership positions occur in the beginning of the fall semester, but for those who are still seeking leadership positions, do not fret – there is a lot of preparing that you can get done during the next year, and it is much better to be a dedicated and involved member in your organization before signing on to the executive board. And most of all, being in a club to begin with shows a lot of commitment in working hard for your future, especially in an organization such as Collegiate Women in Business, which emphasizes all the skills necessary for success. Attend workshops, meetings, and treks to get a grasp on what CWIB prioritizes. This is no different than being an active employee and engaging with your bosses and peers. The level of commitment you put forth will be recognized, whether you notice it at first or not.

Application Process

Because being an organization leader can come with a lot of responsibilities, there is usually an extensive application process that precedes being appointed to a position. For Collegiate Women in Business, one can get involved during the beginning of the fall semester. During the 2019-2020 school year, an email was sent out in October with a sign-up link for those who wanted to get involved in either the marketing committee or the Chronicles. This sign-up was also announced during the monthly meeting, and new members were able to gain more insight on what responsibilities came with these roles by listening to current officers. Pay attention to the little details of each organization, internship, or job regarding their application process — overlooking something trivial may end up being a disadvantage to you in the end.

Many of these leadership applications consist of a written portion, either a short answer or an essay. These questions can be about anything, such as your leadership skills, experiences, or why you want to get involved. The best way to write these answers is to show genuine interest in what you want to do for the club, internship, or job. Mention events you have attended and showcase the small details that show the application committee that you are dedicated. Then, make sure you highlight your skills to guarantee your ability in being a great asset to the organization. Don’t forget to utilize buzzwords that allow the application committee to connect your skills to the ones they seek.

Interviewing

Once you pass the initial application, you should be notified about the next step of the process. Most clubs will hold interviews because of how much one-on-one meetings can provide insight into your abilities, people skills, and dedication. You can do a lot to prepare for this step, and at least a little preparation is necessary to have a successful interview.

One way you can prepare is by writing down your top achievements and skills, anything that would help assure your interviewers of your capabilities. Next, you can search on Google for potential questions that might come up for your particular position. For example, when searching for questions that might come up in a position for the Chronicles, you might want to search for “interview questions for journalists.” Practice answering these questions using the bullets you wrote before, and get a good grip on what you would want to say, or not say, during the interview.

Another way to prepare is to get a friend to ask you interview questions on the spot without any preparation beforehand. This way, you can improve your ability in quick but knowledgeable responses, and get a good idea on what questions might be asked. For any particular questions you get stuck on, make sure you review these thoroughly in case your interviewer asks a similar one. By preparing well for your interview questions, you can go above and beyond the expectations of the interviewer and take a huge step towards the position you want!

Acceptance

For most positions, the last step will be waiting to hear back on whether you landed the position or not. For those who do, congratulations! However, it is important to revisit the responsibilities of your new position and reevaluate if you will be able to uphold these requirements. If so, you can accept your new position and wait for further instructions. Always remember to thank the committee for your offer!

If you do not get the position you desired, there is no need to worry! Rejections will happen more often than not, but new positions open up every year, and you should not settle for a role that you do not have much interest in. Take the time to build your skills, and by the next time you apply, your organization will have a much better idea of who you are and your commitment to the position.

Competitive career fields can require skills such as leadership and communication. To demonstrate these skills, you should join organizations and seek leadership positions that you are interested in. By putting your full effort into the application process, your organization should be able to see your dedication and skills and accurately evaluate whether you will be a good fit for the position or not. Going through with these processes in college will not only make you a contributing member of your organization, but also prepare you for real-world applications of these steps! Get a head start and don’t be afraid to take advantage of leadership positions here at school, and especially in Collegiate Women in Business, to gain those much needed abilities!

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Collegiate Women in Business’ 2019-2020 Leadership Team

By: Gyu Ri Kim

 

Meet the CWIB Chronicles’ Writers!

The CWIB Chronicles is your go-to resource for articles intended to empower, prepare, and connect our readers. I’m very excited to introduce you to the faces behind the amazing articles you will be reading! I’m honored to work with these talented ladies and know they will provide the best writing to you all. Keep reading to meet your 2019-2020 Chronicles’ writers!

Lindsay BarnesLindsay Barnes

Lindsay is a freshman majoring in Business Management, and hopes to pursue a Spanish minor. In addition to being a Chronicles writer, Lindsay is a member of the Love Your Melon Campus Crew and Snow Club. She loves the school spirit Virginia Tech provides, especially through attending football games. She has enjoyed meeting people of different backgrounds and the fact that there are so many activities and clubs here. Outside of school, Lindsay enjoys hanging out with friends, staying active by playing sports like field hockey, soccer, basketball, and skiing, as well as watching Netflix. Lindsay is excited to be apart of the Chronicles so that she can become an involved member with CWIB, as well as have a group to go to for support. With that, comes a great opportunity for her to grow her writing skills! She hopes members feel inspired through CWIB and know that we are always rooting for each other to succeed! She wants them to take advantage of this great group of women who are always around to offer academic and professional support.

Lauren MilesLauren Miles

Lauren is a freshman majoring in Marketing Management and Statistics, with a career goal to work as a Market Research Analyst. She is involved with the Japanese Culture Association and Beekeeping Club, as well as working at Hokie Grill here on campus. Lauren loves how kind everyone at Virginia Tech is, and thinks the on-campus food is great! In her free time, she enjoys reading, eating, being with friends, and watching movies. Lauren wanted to be a part of the Chronicles so that she had a creative outlet where she could help provide fun and insightful articles to our members! This year, Lauren hopes members can experience an inclusive and empowering community through being a CWIB member. She wants us to feel supported by each other, whether it is through exploring career paths, networking, or learning more about our unique individualities.

Gyu Ri KimGyu Ri Kim

Gyu Ri is a sophomore majoring in Marketing Management, specifically Digital Marketing, and hopes to work as a Marketing Manager. Here at Virginia Tech, she is a business manager-in-training for the Bugle, and is on the events and social media team for Her Campus. She appreciates how open everyone is to being your friend here, and how easy it is to get involved in organizations. For fun, Gyu Ri likes to cook or bake, spend time with friends, and watch movies. She is most excited to exercise her writing skills with the Chronicles, as this can give her a break from practicing math problems in her classes! Of course, she is also ready to make new friends within the organization! Gyu Ri hopes members will be able to share empowerment amongst other strong and intelligent women in business, and feel inspired to do great things in life!

Grace FarmeloGrace Farmelo

Grace is a freshman who is currently Business Undecided, but is leaning towards Management or Entrepreneurship, with a minor in creative writing. One day, she wants to run her own equestrian center. Here at school, Grace is involved with YoungLife and hopes to start playing intramural sports and ride horses in Blacksburg. In her free time, she enjoys going to football games, riding horses, playing rink soccer, and getting coffee with friends. Through the Chronicles, Grace is excited to apply her passion for writing in order to empower our readers! She is ready to inspire her peers and better her writing skills through publishing articles. Grace hopes members find a sense of community within CWIB, since this is what she loves most about Virginia Tech. Additionally, she hopes they find the inspiration to pursue their degree with passion and feel empowered after reading Chronicles articles.

Paige HornPaige Horn

Paige is a sophomore majoring in Management Marketing. Ultimately, she wants to help others by working for a company that promotes an inclusive and progressive atmosphere. Not only is Paige invested in the Chronicles, but she is also a member of the business fraternity Delta Sigma Pi and sorority Alpha Chi Omega. Because of these organizations, Paige feels that Virginia Tech truly is home, and values the supportive and accepting community here. When Paige isn’t hard at work, she enjoys spending time with friends, hiking, playing soccer, and watching Netflix. By being a Chronicles writer, she is eager to share her voice on business topics and expand upon the guiding principles that encompass the culture and goals of CWIB. Overall, Paige wants members to feel empowered through CWIB, academically and socially, to achieve their personal and professional goals.

Ashley MattsonAshley Mattson

Ashley is a junior majoring in Business Information Technology and Finance. She hopes to work within the government, and then for the FBI. In addition to being a Chronicles’ writer, she is a mentor within the Mentorship Program at CWIB and is looking to start showjumping as a horseback rider here in Blacksburg. She feels Virginia Tech professors and students provide a supportive atmosphere where we all can succeed, which is why she loves the community within this school. For fun, Ashley enjoys playing field hockey, spending time with friends, watching movies, and running! She is excited to work on her writing with the Chronicles, since many of her classes do not involve writing. She believes that writing is a very important skill and is ready to take advantage of this opportunity to write more often! Ashley wants members to utilize the Chronicles as a valuable tool to guide them through various aspects of their professional endeavors, as well as to provide a source of inspiration.

cwibfall2019.jpgEmma Harwood

Emma is a junior majoring in Human Nutrition, Foods, and Exercise with a concentration on Dietetics. Her career goal is to work within pediatric nutrition and dietetics. In addition to her role as Editor-in-Chief of the Chronicles, she is a manager for the Women’s Basketball team, works at McComas, and is a member of the Student Nutrition and Dietetics Association. In her free time, Emma enjoys working out, skiing, cooking, and spending time with family and friends. She feels fortunate to attend Virginia Tech where they offer excellent academic opportunities in line with her professional goals, as well as being the place she has met some of her closest friends. Emma aims to give her writers the confidence she was given as a staff writer, and help them develop their writing skills so that they feel proud that their pieces are positively affecting our readers! She hopes members read the Chronicles and feel empowered to take the steps needed to accomplish their goals, prepared to tackle difficult situations, and connected to other women by being inspired by those around us.

By: Emma Harwood

The CWIB Events Guide

CWIB Leadership manages a lot of their time and effort putting together several events for members throughout the year, but what’s the difference between them all? We want to make sure you all know what events we offer and why you should attend as many as possible to get the most out of this organization! Hopefully this guide to all-things CWIB events helps clarify any discrepancies you may have and encourages you to come out to the exciting events we have planned!

Monthly Meetings

Monthly meetings are probably the most well-known events we have to offer. The first Wednesday of every month, we meet for about an hour to socialize with members, inform members of upcoming events, hear from inspiring speakers, sell merchandise, and answer any questions or concerns members may have. Sometimes we even provide free food! Monthly meetings are a great way to get acclimated with all that is happening during the particular month and make sure you mark your calendars so that you know when everything is going on! Most monthly meetings begin with business-related ice-breakers or trivia questions that allow you to work with fellow members and get to know each other. Each meeting will normally have a theme to follow along with all the information that is provided. For the 2019-2020 academic year, we will focus monthly meetings on our pillar, “Empower.” We highly encourage members to attend every monthly meeting, as they only occur once a month, and really help keep you up to date so you don’t miss any important information! We’ll see you at our first monthly meeting of the semester on October 2nd in NCB 260 at 7:00 pm!

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A room full of members attending a Monthly Meeting!

Socials

Socials are organized by our Chief Operating Officer, VP of Operations, and Events Committee. They are casual get-togethers that allow members to have fun and interact outside of professional events. For example, last year we went to Sinkland Farms for our pumpkin patch social, held a Halloween themed game night, and a Galentine’s Day movie night. These are great ways to spend time with friends and meet new people in a laid-back setting! Some socials will occur on campus, while other times we are out in the Blacksburg community. The Events Committee determines when to hold socials, based on when other events are taking place; however, they aim for an equal number of socials to happen in the spring and fall semesters. You will hear about the time and dates for socials through attending monthly meetings and reading our weekly newsletter.

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CWIB members having fun at our Halloween-themed game night!

Coffee Chats

Coffee chats allow members to speak with professionals in the workplace in a relaxed atmosphere. Normally, we invite one individual to sit down with us and chat about her personal experiences throughout college, such as how she came to hold the position she does, what she studied as an undergrad, and any advice she has for us moving forward in our career search. These personal situations alleviate any nerves of talking to professionals in a more structured setting by allowing members to ask questions and get to know the individual. We encourage you to take advantage of coffee chats as these are opportunities where successful women have the time to sit and speak with us and answer any of our questions! We have had businesswomen from Cvent and Deloitte, as well as professors from international universities sit and chat with us. I find coffee chats very genuine and leave them feeling motivated and inspired.; these experiences have opened my eyes to career possibilities I hadn’t even thought of pursuing.

Workshops

CWIB is fortunate to collaborate with our sponsors each year by running workshops dedicated to career advancement. At these workshops, we cover skills such as resume building, diversity and inclusion, and negotiation, to name a few. Learning these skills from business professionals is a privilege that gives us a hands-on opportunity to the insight on real workplace practices. Our sponsors dedicate time out of their busy schedules to work with us, so it is important we take advantage of these resources we are provided! We hope you didn’t miss out on our first workshops of the semester where Protiviti hosted a resume building and Business Horizons prep, and The Select Group helped us work on making a great first impression! Don’t worry if you weren’t able to make it; we have plenty of workshops planned that will help you strengthen your professional skills.

Power Panel 

Power Panel is our biggest event of the year which takes place in the spring semester. We invite business professionals to sit on a panel and answer pressing questions related to a particular theme. For example, last year we were honored to have three influential business women talk to us about their experiences finding courage in the workplace. Frances Reimers, Tricia Harper, and Allison Sitch graciously spoke about the companies they work for, difficulties they faced as professional women, and gave advice for us starting out in our careers. Prior to the panel, a private networking session for CWIB members only was held where we were able to introduce ourselves to the panelists and get to know each other. Power Panel has always been a success, so make sure you don’t miss this event in the spring! Be on the lookout to see who our guests will be this year…

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Tricia Harper, Allison Sitch, and Frances Reimers (middle left to right) with CWIB leadership!

Treks 

Treks are a fantastic opportunity to gain real-world experience. Our Chief Development Officer and VP of Treks plan around 2-3 treks a semester where a group of CWIB members get to attend events hosted by different business in order to see what their culture is like, what a typical day on the job consists of, and network with professionals. New York City, Nashville, Atlanta, Raleigh, and Washington, D.C. are a few places we have either been or are planning to visit! Not only do you receive an impressive professional experience, you are able to grow closer to other CWIB members and sight-see in a major city! Now I know you all can’t wait to sign up for the first trek, so let me explain the application process. Every CWIB member who wants to attend a trek must apply. Questions range from how many previous CWIB events have you attended, to, what qualities do you believe make a good leader? These questions are designed to gauge your commitment as a CWIB member, as well as get a feel for the types of responses you would give to business professionals if asked. Treks do cost money; however, with all that is included, the prices are extremely reasonable! Be sure to pay attention for more information on upcoming treks, and if you have any more questions about them, reach out to some of the women who have attended previous ones! We are so excited to hear about how our first trek went when those who will be attending the NYC Women in Business trip this September 12th-13th return to Blacksburg!

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Want more insight on treks? Check out our Chronicles articles to get a sense of what members got out of going on treks!

I hope something about each of these events caught your eye and that you’re ready to get involved with CWIB! I’m so proud of all the hard work put forth in making these events so successful, so be sure to attend as many as you can! We can’t wait to see you all soon!

By: Emma Harwood

Helpful Business Resources

With a world as complex as ours, it is often hard to stay up to date on current events. During the summer, this may be even more difficult as we are not in class constantly hearing about business trends or corporate news. Technology, stock market fluctuations, growing innovative mindsets, demands of consumers, and many more individual factors make the business world especially difficult to stay up to date with. As women beginning our journeys into the corporate world, it is important that we remain knowledgeable about what is happening within it. That knowledge should include both large events as well as daily happenings, ranging from current events, to informing ourselves of the newest entrepreneurial tactics, business insights, and career advice. Our world is changing rapidly, but we can do our part to change it for the better. If we remain knowledgeable, we can make a difference as women in the business world.

No matter the platform(s) you choose to use as your resources, select one that empowers you with rich information and helps you grow as a businesswoman. You can look into social media pages, websites, podcasts, journals, printed options, and much more. Do your own research of the platforms and news sources you prefer and feel comfortable using weekly, and even daily. Many websites even allow you to modify and personalize what information you wish to see. According to our CWIB members, podcasts are a favorite when it comes to recent business news and operations. Below are suggestions of helpful business resources that many of our members use to help you get started!

Podcasts: 

So Money: This podcast is hosted by financial specialist Farnoosh Torabi. It aims to inform listeners of strategies involving money, developed by top business professionals. They share financial philosophies, wins, failures, and habits to provide insight into what listeners should or should not do involving their finances. You can even ask Torabi financial questions you may have!

So money

Business Daily: Staying up to date with international business is very important, as markets around the world are interdependent. This podcast is a perfect source of information regarding international business! It consists of weekly reviews of business news from around the world. This can be beneficial for our members who study abroad or are interested in working in another country at some point in their professional careers.

Business daily

Skimm’d from the Couch: On this podcast, co-founders and co-CEOs, Carly Zakin and Danielle Weisberg, share their journey of how they started their company from a couch. They have influential female leaders and businesswomen as guests on the podcast as well. They discuss careers, failure, and what the road to success is truly like. It is a raw environment that shares the truth of the business world!

Skimmed from the couch

The $100 MBA Show: Hosted by Omar Zenhom, this podcast shares actual business lessons from real entrepreneurs. Zenhom reaches out to top experts to serve as guest teachers on the show. This podcast delivers solid business advice, in an attempt to provide applicable, actionable information for all listeners.

MBA show

RISE: New York Times Best-Selling Author, Rachel Hollis, hosts this tactical business podcast. She holds bold conversations with business powerhouses as well as leaders in personal development. She hopes to provide listeners with valuable information that they can apply to their own real-life situations. This podcast is a great source of empowerment for anyone listening!

Rachel Hollis

How I Built This: One of the most popular podcasters, Guy Raz, speaks about some of the world’s best-known companies. He talks about innovators, entrepreneurs, and idealists, and the movements they formed. You can hear all about the extensive journeys of these companies and individuals involved.

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Newsletter: 

Morning Brew: This newsletter sends out a daily briefing to its targeted audience, millennials. Specifically, it is designed for young business professionals. The newsletter consists of a stock market recap, a few short briefings of the most important daily business news, and a small lifestyle section. Students enrolled in Foundations of Business at Virginia Tech were even required to subscribe to this newsletter!

Morning Brew

Magazine: 

Bloomberg Businessweek: This is an American magazine that is published weekly. It provides information about recent events in the business world. That information includes insights and interpretations of the people, companies, events, and trends that are involved in how and why the corporate world operates the way it does.

Bloomsberg

Newspaper: 

The Wall Street Journal: As a business-focused newspaper, The Wall Street Journal provides international daily news involving the business world. It is published six days a week by Dow Jones & Company, which is also a major stock market index. All students taking Introduction to Finance even have to subscribe to this newspaper, which can be accessed online or in print.

wall street journal

Book:

How Women Rise: Leadership expert Sally Helgesen and leadership coach Marshall Goldsmith co-authored this book, hoping to motivate their readers. Helgesen and Goldsmith reveal the most common habits that hold women back from getting a raise, promotion, or job. Specifically, women face different obstacles while striving for success in the workplace. This is both an inspirational and helpful read!

How women rise

No matter the resource(s) you choose to use, CWIB hopes that you use these suggestions to help further your own knowledge of today’s business world and its operations. By preparing yourself for all that the business world entails, you have a step up in your professional career. We cannot wait to see all that you do in the future!

By: Allison Wood

Following Up with Recruiters

Networking is an important aspect of the job search process and can be a great way to get to know recruiters in a more relaxed setting. Often times, recruiters will give you their contact information for after the event. Following up after an event may be unfamiliar but it is an avenue to foster a relationship with recruiters you meet, ultimately creating a great resource as you navigate through the job search process and transition into the corporate scene. These guidelines for following up will help you gain a solid foundation for contacting recruiters after networking.

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1. Try to follow up within a few days after the event. It will be easier for your recruiter to remember you and your conversation if you follow up sooner rather than later.

2. Include the event name, time, and place you met. For example, “Hi ____, it was nice meeting you at Hokies On Wall Street on Friday.” This will help jog the recruiters’ memories and confirm that you were paying diligent attention to all aspects of the conversation during your time networking.

conversation bubbles

3. Incorporate a memorable aspect of your conversation from the event in your message. Recruiters often meet and interview many students during recruiting season. Adding a memorable topic will ensure that the recruiter will remember you. For example, “I enjoyed speaking with you about marketing and aspects of building your own brand.” This will also help elicit further conversations on the job responsibilities you are most interested in pursuing.

4. Ask for advice. At the recent Hokies On Wall Street, an employee from Resy said, “Email people you networked with and ask for advice. It’s a great way to continue your conversation and learn from them.”

Thank you

5. Thank the recruiter. As recruiters are very busy, it’s important to express appreciation for speaking with you. This common courtesy will never go unnoticed and is crucial for maintaining your positive reputation in every professional interaction.

6. Connect on LinkedIn, which will make it easy to stay connected with your recruiter. When you send a request on LinkedIn, make sure to send a message with it so they know who you are. This can also open doors to connections with other business professionals. You never know who knows who, so expanding your network is always an asset in obtaining your dream job. There are many ways through which to follow up with a recruiter besides LinkedIn, such as Email or even a thank you card to a recruiter if he or she has gone out of his or her way to connect you with helpful resources.

coffee

7. Suggest meeting again. If you’re interested in continuing your conversations, suggest meeting for coffee, which is a good option to get to know each other in a more casual and personal setting.

8. Always proofread every message you send a recruiter. It’s always a good idea to have a peer look over your message before sending to make sure there are no errors. Little mistakes like punctuation or grammar errors reflect a lack in attention to detail and convey a sloppy work attitude. No recruiter wants to have this impression of you.

envelopeFollowing up after networking can show recruiters that you are dedicated, interested, and engaged, whether that be in them personally or the company they work for. While it can feel intimidating to reach out to a recruiter or if you fear that you are coming across annoying or pushy, do not let these thoughts stop you from pursuing an opportunity. Employees love to talk about the great companies they work for, so more often than not they will be more than happy to share more knowledge with you! If you follow these guidelines for contacting recruiters, you will be better able to stay connected with and build your professional relationships.

By: Abby Perkins